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THE 1948 TOWER 

Annual Publication of The Stout Student Associa- 
tion of The Stout Institute, Menomonie, Wisconsin 



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THE STOUT INSTITUTE 

MENOMONIE, WISCONSIN 



Louis Bi rmeister: Editor 
Russell Gerber: Business Manager 

Mr. Dnvicht Chin\(k:k: Stuff Advisor 
Mr. Thomas Fleming: Literary Advisor 














0* lT 




IN MEM 



Ittiss Louise Buchanan 



The untimely death of Miss Louise Buchanan in an automobile accident, November 22, 
shocked the entire college. For over 20 years a member of Stout's department of foods and 
nutrition, she had endeared herself to all with her quiet charm and sincerity. 

Biu/nman's concept of education was truly reflected in the adequacy of her teach- 
ing. Unobtrusive, yet constantly alert and always seeding improvement in those she taught. 
her achievements were not aimed at attracting notice; rather they developed within her stu- 
dents the values which would serve them well throughout life. 

A colleague in the home economics division once said of Louise Buchanan. "All the 
women who ever studied under her, lifted her." For one who devoted her life to teaching, 
that is the perfect tribute. 



m 



O RY OF 



Harry f . Good 




Many years ago, Harry F. Good, in answer to a questionnaire inquiring of his teaching 
experience, replied, "My greatest satisfaction from teaching comes in seeing the success at- 
tained b\ young persons who were once my students." Such a philosophy is truly typical of a 
man whose entire career did honor to the teaching profession. 

In Mr. Good's death, January 27, the college lost a true friend and a valued instructor. 
Never too busy to aid a student or a student group, he was closely allied with formation 
and direction of Stout's early singing organization, was a member of the social affairs com- 
mittee, and was sponsor of F.O.B. fraternity. He was a tireless worker, while on the Stout 
housing committee, in providing adequate housing for student veterans. 

A classroom instructor of high achievement, beloved by both those he taught and with 
whom he worked, Harry F. Good was our friend. We shall not forget him. 



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Administration 




Dr. Verne C. Fryklund, President 

THE STOUT INSTITUTE 



C103 



THE STOUT INSTITUTE 

-git WISCONSIN 



ortttt s# lac muni! 



June 1, 1948 

To the Class of "48 
The Stout Institute 

As yoi, the ambers of the 1948 graduating class, take leavo of 
u« to enter upon the careers whose preparation has required froa eaoh of 
four pro- , . . *rno«t wis'-.et r success and 

express all r th« strength - r.r» shown by 

success: -allege wcr . 

of a person merely to desire to be a college 
graduate; actual graduation, however, represents for you * definite triumph 
because you have completed tho arduous labor required of all rho desire a 
degree froa T : . . . , •..-..• the 

personal .- , -lotod by the col La 

and ". resource now -.ade available tc all aanki- . 

As a personal achievement, graduation froa college constitutes 
a tangible asse;. Open before you now are unlimited : , 

■-.£ numerous other 
rewarding fields. Li".© whiohever work yee • ,-r, you will carry 

■ a gr 
r.-i the skills a... . evidence 

~so whe receive froa us a college degree* 

For The Stout Institute too, your successful completion of the 
college z'j^rs-: is an asset. As you prove yourself in hone oconoaies 

and industrial educ it success is constant evidence of the value and 

thoroughness of t ■ c.-k being offered on cur campus. Tour achievenents will, 
perhaps, be adrrcred again and a-: 1 graduation froa 

Institute of young people with whoc you "-.avo coae in eootaet. 

To all mankind you now have become personnel needed for achieving 
: of world which we all desire. You are skilled women and men, trained 
your field, yet rcssossing also a social nut 

dedicates that learning to the service oi* ethers. As teachers of home 
economic: r ttrial od . -.ve beer : every way to a 

the coair. . .- commercial or industrial endea. 

your talents o orvioes at orld so greatly r.eeic. 

So, again, let ne axpresa to you who ars graduating my s ir.cere 
wish that the coming yoars bring sic*ess • .We 

ild like to '-.are you stay longer here with us, e our valued 

friends. This cannot bej destiny awaits you. Co : rained to achieve. 

and may j iraaaanta reflec jpor. you oenor.u; . >olIege, 

Sinoerely fours. 






.-.-. a] lent 



CUD 




Cm m Bowman 

Dean, Division of Industrial Education 
Director of Summer Session 



Dean Price's valuable teaching ami adminis- 
tration experiences are reflected in his efficient 
administration as Dean of Men. His teaching is 
in the fields of political science and education. 
Through his service on the Faculty Committee 
on Student Affairs and on the Stout Housing 
Committee, he has made definite contributions 
to the welfare of the college and the students. 
The men of Stout appreciate his work in the 
handling of many of their problems. 

Dean Price took his undergraduate work at 
the Saint Cloud State Teachers College in Min- 
nesota, and the University of Minnesota. His 
graduate study was also done at the University 
of Minnesota. 



Dean Bowman lias done invaluable work in 
the field of industrial education since 1919, 
when he became a member of The Stout Insti- 
tute faculty. He is a recognized leader of the 
new graduate program which oilers a fifth year 
of work for graduate students. Dean Bowman 
has been with Stout since it developed from a 
two-year training school to a full-fledged four- 
year teachers college and has kept the school's 
shops and courses abreast of the times. 





Merle M. Price 
Dean of Men 



C123 



Dr. Alice J. Kirk assumed the position of the 
Dean of the division of Home Economics in 
September when she filled the vacancy left by 
Dean Michaels. Dr. Kirk's work has not been 
confined to college teaching only, although she 
has spent a considerable amount of time in the 
field of college education. She has served as 
director of home economics at Rochester Insti- 
tute of Technology, Rochester, New Y'ork; 
Russell Sage College, Troy, New York: and the 
University of Denver, Denver, Colorado. For 
seven years she was the regional director for 
the national organization of Girl Scouts. 

Miss Kirk holds a Doctor's Degree and a 
Master's degree from Columbia University and 
a Bachelor's degree from the University of Wis- 
consin. 





Dr. Alice J. Kirk 

Dean, Division of Home Economics 



A member of the faculty since 1936. she was 
appointed Dean of Women in 1945. Her con- 
stant contact with young women through social 
organizations and as director of physical educa- 
tion for women has given her valuable experi- 
ence which adds to her qualifications as Dean 
of Women. Dean Antrim has given many hours 
of valuable assistance to make the student 
union a success. She received her R.A. degree 
from Lake Forest, Illinois, and her Ph. M. de- 
gree from the University of Wisconsin. 



Ketlrah Antrim 
Dean of Women 



nil 




•v>DERBERC 

Instructor of Industrial Education 
Woodworking 



K. T. ( >I.M N 

fit Professor of Int. 
Education 

Woodworking, Carpentry 



H. M. Hansen 

Associate Professor of Industrial 

Education 



Woodworking Deportment 

Woodworking was among the first courses of the original in the Industrial Education courses 
Stout. Woodworking was offered in the program for co-ordination of hand. mind, and eye. Later in 
the trend toward what is now known as Industrial Education, woodworking became one ol the basic 
technical courses offered in teacher training. Cabinet making and mi II work were added and taught 
in what is now the maintenance mu\ engineering worshop. The present engine room was the mill- 
room. Woodturning occupied the present printing press room. 

In l y H the shops were moved to the trade building and many additions made to the curricu- 
lum. Also, knowledge of wood and its properties, and the most effective and correct methods of its 
use are presented in the field. 




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R \\ F. Kranzi 
. Issociatc Professor of Industrial 

Education 

Auto Mechanics, General Mechanics 



John [arvis 
'.ant Professor of Science unci 
and Mathematics 



Electricity and General Mechanics Department 

In 1918 and 1919 two new courses were opened to students at Stout. The iirst was a course in 
auto mechanics, which was begun in very small surroundings and now is taught in a shop well 
equipped tor instruction in both construction and servicing. The second course, offered in spi; 
limited facilities, wis in the held of electricity. Through the years these shops have grown and at 
the present feature four courses in auto mechanics, three in electricity, two in radio, two in general 
mechanics, physics III (strength of materials). .uu\ general industrial mechanics. These courses. 
however, arc still limited by the space needed that they may function according to the demands of 
the shops, but every elTort to train teachers in these fields is being made. 




Ci?D 



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David Barnard, Instruction of Visual Education. Danibi 
Green, Associate Professor oj Industrial Education. Machine 
Drawing, General Drawing. William R. Baker, Head of 

Department of Graphic . trts and Professor of Industrial Edu- 
cation. Printing and Publications. J. K. Ray. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Industrial Education. Architectural and Freehand 
Drawing, Masonry, Building Construction. Davbi E. Carl* 

SEN, Assistant Professor of Industrial Education. Printing. 







Graphic Arts Deportment 

1 he trends in industrial education have been such that the importance of drawing in connection 
with shop work has been revealed more and more. When the college was first opened, only one 
course in mechanical drawing was offered in the curriculum: however, at the present time, because 
ol enlarged facilities, some fifteen courses are being offered to students now in attendance. Drawings 
related an "printing" lias been taught at Stout since 1 ( >17 and the future trend is to correlate print- 
ing and drawing courses to facilitate the application ot the principles ol layout and design, color the- 
ory, and bindery learned in one field for transfer to the other field. Also included in the graphic- 
arts are visual aids and school publications. 




[16] 







1 [arolo C. Musis 

/ tsoi iate Professor of Industrial 

Education 

Machine Shop. Foundry. Pattern- 
making 



Ralph Bbtterley 

Instruction af In Jus trial Education 

General Metal. Sheet Metal 



Floyd Keith 

Head of Depart nun: of Mctalwor^- 

ing and Professor of Industrial 

Education 

Sheet Metal 



Metal Work Department 

The development of the general metals shop began in the 1920's. In its development to date, the 
shop represents opportunities for work with metal, machine tools, sheet metal, bench metal, oxy- 
acetylene welding, forging, and heat treating. 

The past emergency has shown the vital importance of metal work in our modern civilization. 
The plan of equipment, the organization, the operation of the general metals shop all produce a flexi- 
bility which makes it possible to keep the work up-to-date. New materials, new processes, new hand 
a\u\ machine tools, and the laiestest combination of them will constantly he part ot the working 
opportunities tor the students in this shop. 




CI7D 




Clara ('. Carrison 

. Issistant Professor of Food and 




Mary Blazbk 

Associate Pi ofessor of Food ana 
Nutrition 



Nutrition 



Mary Killi in 
'■ant Professor of Food, 
Institution Management 

Eileen Elliott 

Head of Department and Professor 

of Food and Nutrition 



Foods and Nutrition Department 

Courses in foods mh\ nutrition .ire basic in the training of teachers, home-makers, dietitians, 
and institution management majors. These courses arc directed toward the development of scientific 
training and fundamental understanding of food, nutrition, diet, and chemistry. Practical experiei 
.ire given not only in food preparation and the planning of well-balanced diets, but also in the pur- 
chasing ol tood .uu\ in the planning and service of meals. The student is thus enabled to use and 
interpret food am! nutritional facts in whatever field of work she enters. 

In addition to the basic courses, two special curriculums are offered tor those who wish to pre- 
pare tor institutional management and dietetics. There are many positions in hospitals, restaurants, 
schools, industrial plants, etc.. open to people who have followed either of these curriculums. 

Graduate courses arc also offered in this department leading to the degree of Master of Science 
in home economics with a major in foods and nutrition. 




CI8] 




i^b w< 






1 1 a/.ki. Van Ness 

Usodate Professor of Home 

Economics. Clothing 



Lillian Jeter 

Head of Department of Clothing 

and Professor of Home Economics 



Mrs. Ralph Bitterly 

Instructor of Clothing 



Clothing Department 



The ability t<» make clothing is generally recognized as being a valuable economic resource. The 
additional opportunity, afforded by this ability rbr satisfying the creative experiences essential to men 

t.il and emotion. il well-being, is less generally recognized bill is also important. The Stout Institute 
offers basic and elective courses in clothing construction. The clothing curriculum, both undergradu- 
ate and graduate, is designed to contribute primarily to the personal development of the student and 
to her professional preparation for the teaching of home economics. 




C19] 




Bbnita GsOTl Smith 
tor of Nursery School and 
i iate Professor of Home 
Economics 



Nursery School 



Courses in child development and guidance are included .is part of the home economics curricu- 
lum at The State Institute. 

A nursery school is maintained for prc-sch<x.>l children so that students may sec the application 
of theory to practice in child care and training. The primary purpose of the nursery school program 
is to foster and promote, in co-operation with the parents, the rounded personality development <>f 

the pre-school children. 

The primary objective of the child development program is to help students who arc prospective 

homemakers or teachers of homemaking to learn to love .uu\ enjoy children through a better Under- 
Standing of them. 




C2»3 





1 IYS Tkl LUNGES 

Assistant Professor of Home 

Economic*. Home Management 



Home Management 



The course in home management which includes six weeks of residence in ai\ attractive, comfort- 
able, and conveniendy equipped house offers enriching experiences in group living tor home « 

Lldents in their junior or senior year. Seven to ten women with their resident advisor co- 
operatively share the responsibilities of managing their home for six weeks. As a result of their 
varied experiences, they learn the techniques of effective management and acquire An understanding 

he role of successful management in achieving wholesome and happy family life. 




[21] 




Ki m Ruth Nim iubi 

Head of Department and Assistant 
Professor of Related Art 



Instructor of Relate 



Art Department 



In the days past, art was included in interior decoration .nu\ artistic home furnishings. Today, 
however, art is taught as .1 separate course and is correlated with other home economics courses. 

The principles of art arc taught m the first year. During the third year in school the girls arc 
required to take interior decorating and house furnishing. 

Advanced design, crafts, art appreciation, art history. mm\ weaving .ire offered as elective courses 
to meet the individual needs and interests of the students. Proof of the variety and outcome of these 
classes can be seen in the display cases on the second floor of the Home Economics Building. 




Z221 




»' '<• °"^< • Head 0} Department and Associate Professor of Psychology and Education. Arthi ■ G 
wo».DwichtD.Chinnock,5«^ ate Proles- 

m. R u pn <;. Ivbrson, /'. -.hology and Educat 

Bottom Row: Ann Noble, / d ad of Department and Assistant of Home Et oner, \[ XK( . ,, , 

Harper, Instructor ,n Home Econom ation. Ellen Nelson, Instructor of Homt l< onomii t Education. 

Education Department 

e purpose of the education department at the Stout Institute- is defined by the nature of the College 
itself. It is in the eduction courses, presented in .. well-arranged sequence, that th< future teacher lean 
the nature ol those he later is to be- associated with as students, the- methods and principles thai control l< 

as well as a stud) ol methods ol organizing, presenting, And evaluating the aptitudes, skills and under- 
standings ol the learnt 

The courses begin with an introduction to psychology, proceed through principles .md methods of oreani- 
zation and teaching, followed by supervised student teaching in the junior and senior years. 




C23D 




(fEKTKi-DE L. Callahan 

Head of Department 

and Professor cf English 

Mrs. Herman Arm son 

Instructor of English 



Barbara Lehr 
Instructor of English 





i. 



Waunbta Hain 

Instructor of English 

Marceline Erickson 

Associate Professor of 
English, Speech 



Thom is Fleming 

Instructor of English 



English Department 



The English department endeavors to prepare students in two distinct areas: communication and appre- 
ciation. Subjects in the held of communication develop expression in both writing and speaking capabilities 
vital t:> a competent teacher. Training in appreciation assures additional cultural enjoyment, discrimination, 
critical thinking, and social e. 

Toward competency in communication: two semesters of English composition afford the beginning 
dent instruction in grammar: sentence, paragraph, and theme structure: and vocabulary. Expository writing 
heightens skill in the production of orderly, scholarly papers. Journalistic writing and the writing of feature 
articles olTer electives in authorship. 

S tch I teaches basic speaking principles. Speech II emphasizes audience analysis, speech purposes, and 
parliamentary procedure. Speech III treats group mu\ public discussion. Play production emphasizes Stage sct- 
and crew organization. 

Courses in Shakespeare, poetry, auc\ fiction inspire lite-long cultural standards and contribute to the de- 
veloping of literature appreciation. 




C24] 




C- !> 





Top Row: Mary McCalmont, Associate Professor of Science and Mathematics. Chemistry. Herman C. Arnej 
Assistant Professor of Biology. ElBANOR H. Cox, Associate Professor of Science and Mathematics. Chemistry. MYRON 
HARBOUR, Assistant Professor of Science and Mathematics. 

Bottom Row: CoRYDON L. Rl Professor of Science and Mathematics. ANNE Marshall, Head of Depart- 

ment of Science and Mathematics and Professor of Biological Science. F. E. TfSTlsoN, Associate Professor of Science 
and Mathematics. 

Science and Mathematics Department 

Tin. science and mathematics department became an integral part of The Stout Institute early in the his- 
tory of the college. It is a combined department made up of chemistry, biology, physics, and mathem. 
The primary objective of most courses in this department is to provide basic information necess.iry tor an 
understanding of many of the phases of home economics and industrial education. Much ol the background 
of work in foods and nutrition and textiles lies in the fields of chemistry, biology, mkI bacteriology. Likev 
much of the background of work in drawing, electricity, mechanics, metals, and construction lies in the fields 
of chemistry, physics, and mathematics, ("nurses m science also include among their objectives: an understand- 
ing of the meaning of scientific methods; an ability to think honestly, clearly, mk\ constructively: and an in- 
terest in and an appreciation of the world about us and ourselves. 




C25] 




Dwioh i L. A«.\i.u 

Head of Department and . Issistant 

Professor of Social Science 



Merle M. Price 

Dean of Men and . tssot iatt 
Professor of Social Sen rut 



Mi i\in Si nci k 
instructor of Social Science 



Social Science Deportment 

Winn Tlu- StOUl Institute became a State institution, the social sciences were added to the curric- 
ulum to help fulfill the need for broader teacher education. Courses in sociology, economics, history, 
and government seek to give the student an awareness <>I tlu complexities of modern society, increase 
his understanding of the origins ot society's problems and prepare him for intelligent participation in 
Community activities. 




C263 




H MOLD K I 
Director and Associate 
Profc 



Music 



"Music hath charms!" So also Stout hath charms in the realms of music. Music has been a wel- 
come portion of Stout's curriculum, a vibrant portion with which every student has come m contact. In 
the music courses offered, the students receive instruction in techniques of ear training, rhythm no- 
tation, diatonic and chromatic scales, chord instruction, and acoustics. The various musical groups 
have been very active in playing at games, before assemblies, tor special programs, and tor their spe- 
cial concerts during the year. Perhaps the best known work of The Stout Institute music department, 
however, has been the development of its excellent choral groups. 




[27] 




. Keturah Antrim 
Education and Dean of Women 



Rw C. Johnson 

Head of Department and .1- 
Professor of Physical I'd: 



|t \! MlLLEK 
Instructor of Physical Ed: 



Physical Education 



It was Senator Sn are t<> build the bodies .is well as the minds of students. Both men and 

women of Stout arc required, therefore, to take physical education .\m\ arc encouraged to partici- 

I sides the gymnasium and swimming udents have the uj 

Burton E. Nelson field and the Stoui Lot. In the spring and fall, students may parti< out- 

,1 - activities such as tennis, field hockey, golf, archery, and kittenb.ill. During the winter months, 

may take classes in swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketball, calisthenics, and bowling. Thus 
the formation of sound bodies and minds continues on, and the spirit smanship develops and 

spreads over this campus. 











[2*] 




Gertrude M. O'Brien 

Registrar, Placement 
Chairman 



Business Staff 



The purpose of the business staff is to see thai the clerical, medical, and 
literary components of the school attain their utmost efficiency at Stout. The 
clerical branch has to handle .ill correspondence and office duties required to 
maintain an efficient and accurate record of the school's activities in the per- 
formance of it's duties. The literary branch includes all work in connection 
with both the textbook and reference libraries. The medical branch is in charge 
of the work related to keeping the study body healthy. 

Included in the business staff is the office of the registrar. It is her duty to 
see that all work pertaining to admissions and credits are carried out. Also in- 
cluded in her duties is the aiding in the placemen; ot seniors in the fields of 
industrial education mk\ home economics. 



Minnie J. I 

Secretary to the 
President 




Janet Kothlow 

■rry to Dean 
Hon man 



\ 



Mkv. (ihKTKl DB PlONSIH 

i liege Nurse 



Lillian M. I ; r<k;<;\tt 

Librarian 




H. (). Stro/in-ky 
Chief Engineer 



B. M. Fink 
Business Manager 



C2<0 




Classes 




Class of '48 



9 



President 
IRVINC CHRISTI \S()\ 



Vice President 
FREEMAN GALOFF 




Secrecarj 
ROBERTA IIAN'y >\ 



Treasurer 
MAXINE PENCE 

Sen /or Class 

The Senior class was very active during the homecoming season this year. They had charge ot 
decorating the halls and buildings around the campus, besides building the alumni registration booth. 
They also won the prize tor the most humorous float in the homecoming parade. The seniors 
happy indeed to welcome back many of their old schoolmates who came to visit the school during 
these festivities. 

The Senior class helped in decorating the gym for the Christmas dance, and during the second 
semester held a dinner at which various members of the faculty spoke on the problems concerning the 
field of education. Many students were present and gained considerable information pertaining 
these problems. 

To bring an i:\n\ to their college career as a class, they held a farewell picnic at which everyone 
present had a good time. 



C31] 



ADELE ANDERSON 
Clear Lake. Wisconsin 



DONALD BABST 
Grand Rapids. Minnesota 



AUDREY ANDREASSON 
BAILEY 

Menomonic. Wisconsin 



JAMKS BAILEY 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 




LOUIS BELOW 

Stanlcv. Wisconsin 



OMER BENN 
Tomah, Wisconsin 



WILLAKD BENS* >N 
Menomonic. Wisconsin 






GEORGE BLANCHARD 

Auburn, W;ishinj;ton 



SAM BELCASTK' I 
Eveleth, Minnesota 



Ml 








|OHN CARDINAL 
Chippewa Palls, Wisconsin 



C32] 



IRVING CHRISTENS] N 

Racine. Wisconsin 



RUTH DAVIES 
Shell Lake, Wisconsin 



l.\\VKI\( I DKCKKK 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



ARTHUR DIETRICH 

Cociott. Wisconsin 



RAYMOND DOANE 

Sparta. Wisconsin 




WALTER Dl SOLD 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



JUNK EDEBERG 
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin 



RONALD EHART 
[anesville, Wisconsin 



ALBERT ERICKSON 
Virginia, Mini* 



SHIRLEY IKK Km )\ 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



C33 3 



MILDRED PRASE 
Eau Claire, Wisconsin 



ALICE I KOEBA 
Marchfidd. Wisconsin 



FREEMAN GALOFF 

Elmwood, Wisconsin 



JOHN (JOODRICH 
Mcnomonic, Wisconsin 



MARY CH1NNOCK 
GOODRICH 

Menomonie, Wi 




WALTER GORR 

Shell I-akc. Wisconsin 



WILLIAM GRANOS 
K\clcth. Minnesota 



JEANNE GREENLEE 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 



JERRY HOGAN 

Kenosha. Wisconsin 



BERNARD HUGHES 

Menonomie, Wisconsin 



C34D 



CLIFFORD INGWELL 

Rice l.akc. Wisconsin 



LESLIE KATEKARU 
Honolulu. T.H. 



LYN KINCiSLEY 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



JOHN KRANCE 
Eveleth, Minnesota 



EUGENE 
KRANSCHUSTER 

Bloomer, Wisconsin 




BETTY KUENZL 
Oshkosh, Wisconsin 



RICHARD KIRSHINSKV 
Rice Lake, Wisconsin 



l'HILII' UBORDE 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



ANNABELL HART 
LARS! \ 

(Men 1 lawn, Wisconsin 



HERBERT LEHMAN 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



C353 



WILLIAM LENSING 

Two Risers. Wisconsin 



GORDON LINDBERO 
Ironwocxl. Michigan 



ALICE McVICAR 
Sionc Lake, Wisconsin 



HELEN MELVILLE 
Cadott. Wisconsin 




MARIAN MUELLER 
Strum, Wisconsin 



(.1 KHARD NELSON 
Kn.ipp. Wisconsin 



MAX N1COL 
Sparta. Wisconsin 



MARY LOUISE ()TT 
Racine. Wisconsin 



|o^ ERICKSON 

MERKLEY 

Amcry. Wisconsin 




▲ fc 



DONALD PANGBORN 
Chippewa Palls, Wisconsin 



C.<'»D 



MAXINE PENCE 
Spring Valley, Wisconsin 



rOHN PERRY 

( Ircat Palls. Montana 



ARLENE PICK 
Monroe, Wisconsin 



HELEN QUILLING 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



RICHARD ROBERTSON 
Bloomington, Illinois 




(AMPS ROCKWELL 
Mondovi, Wisconsin 



WILLIAM ROERIG 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



PIXJAR ROSS 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



PLMPR RUDIGER 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



l)()L(il.AS SANDOW 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



C37] 



II. A SAUTTER 

rest, Wisconsin 



EDWARD SAXHAUG 

Hvikih. Minnesota 



|AMES SCHELUN 
Eland, Wi$< 



|()HN SCHIELKE 
Stoughton, Wisconsin 



SHIRLEY SCHNITZLER 
Glenwood City, Wisconsin 




ROSE SCIANNI 
Cudahy, Wisconsin 



EMILY SLAMAR 
Kenosha, Wisconsin 



AILEEN SLOCUMB 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



MIRIAM TeBl 
Baldwin, Wisconsin 



|OHN ni 

(;icnw<xxl City, Wisconsin 



C38] 



|AMES TIMMERMAN 

Mcnomonie. Wisconsin 



GEORGE TIMKTTI 
Mosincc. Wisconsin 



ROBERT THOMAS 
Birch wood. Wisconsin 



ROBERT THOMPTO 
Mew Auburn, Wisconsin 




MARJORIE THULL 
Sheboygan, Wis« 



GIBSON VANPATTER 
Glen Flora, Wisconsin 



LLOYD WARN 
eth, Minnesota 



( AROL WIDDER 

Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



MAX1NK WURT7 
Elm wood. Wisconsin 



C39] 



DORIS BRIMER 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



IAMKS BRUM I 

Wakefield, Michigan 



JLAX CANTRELL 
Downsville, Wisconsin 



BEVERLY GIKLING 
LaCrosse, Wisconsin 



JEANNE GONSOLIN 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 




ROLAND KEHRBERG 
Mosinee, Wisconsin 



ROSE KROG 
Pon Wing, Wis 



WILLIAM LUCK 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



ROBERT parsons 
Ft. Dodge, Iowa 



MARGARi I 
PENNINGTON 

Superior, Wisconsin 



C40 1 



VERENA PRICK 
Unity, Wisconsin 




ADELINE SCHAEFER 
RICHTER 

< )vsro. Wisconsin 




ft 



HERBERT SIMS 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



JOHN KROCK 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



GERHARD NELSON 
Knapp, Wisconsin 




C-*i 3 




Hell's Angels. Smile for Blisters safe. The bosy from the milk^ bar, Dehne can dream of the angels above, Jimmy 
Durante Schank^, Slim Dicf^ and the boys. 



C-12] 




Class of '49 



President 
WILLIAM YOUNG 



Vice President 
KENNET1 1 SCI IANK 








Secretary 
IARRIET OKUYAMA 



Treasurer 
|IAX STERNER 




Junior Class 

The junior class was .in active organization again this year. They participated in many school 
events and activities of which homecoming was included. The class had double duties this year when 
it came to homecoming. Instead of having one gym to decorate, they had two. They did very well 
converting the army and gym into appropriate dance halls by using original decorations, thus keep- 
ing with the spirit of the theme *CAVU!" 

The class was again the sponsor of the annual Spring Prom. They worked out interesting decora- 
tions and put on a good publicity campaign to help make it one of the biggest Proms that Stout has 
ever had. 

To conclude an active year the class held a very informal and enjoyable picnic in May. 



C-J33 




Ron One: Herbert Barnhan, Margaret Bcrtagnelli, Bernicc Benson, Bett) Achterkirch. 
AW Two: John Bendix, Helge Abrahamson, Arvin Ahlf, Norman Anderson, foseph Bcrto- 

Ictti. 

Rou Thnc: Arthur Baetz, Margon, Walter Bandlow, Cyril Berkowitz. 



Ron One: Roseann Patricia Houle, Olive Brownell. 

Row Two: Curtis Briggs, William Brandvold, lack Bongey, Edward Burns. 

Rou Three Louis Burmeister, Sheridan Bracken. Halvor Christianson, Carroll Brusen. 




C40 




Ron One: [oyce Puhrmann, Kelma Puller, Mar) Lou Friberg, Eileen Dillman. 

l\".-( Tiro: Harold Osborn. Doris Counsel!. Dolores Eggebrecht, [can Dillman, Paul Hal- 

verson. 
Row Three: Raymond Cornwcll, Robert Desmarais, Russell Hall, Kenneth Darling. 



Row One: Mildred Hanson, Audrey Harlander, Hetty Dengel, Marilyn Haywood. 

Row Two: Stephen Grudichak, Roberta Hanson, Kathryn Gerondale, Virginia [ackson, 

Krncsl I lauckv. 
Row Three: Robert Jackson. Richard HogStad, Richard Herzing, William Hornlxck. 

Parnik 1 lazarian. 




C«D 




Row One Miry Lundin, Kathleen Hogue. Elaine Johnson, Zona Rac Hines. 
Row Two: Bernioe fanssen, Gustav Jansscn, Robert Hurd. Helen Kelley. 
Rou Three: Warren Lawson, Neil Lucey, Victor Hendries, fim Lange. 



Row One: Donna Kragh, Ruth KnowleS, Lucille Lindberg, lean Sherman. 
Row Two: Dorothy Kopp, Mary Valley, Richard Maliszewski, Bernice Johnson. 
Row Three Raymond Moessner. Kster Medtlie, Herbert Meisncr. Elaine Lcemkuil, Roben 
McKay. 




C-J6] 




Rou One: Rose Mary Olbert, Harriet Okuyama, Phyllis Miller, Wilma Loomans. 

Row Two: Joseph Mocogni. LcRoy Parsons. Joe l.ongo, James Bennington. 
Row Three: Wesley I. unci. Klmer EggCTt, Eugene Dyke. William Bottomlcy, John 
Neumann. 



Row One: Patricia Moore, Alma Niessner, Ruth Newman, Phyllis Onsagcr. 
Row Two: Gordon Rehni. Cordon Niessner. ('lusur Plewa, Francis Perrigoue. 

Row Three Marian Piintak. Mel v in Olson. Ellsworth Kane, Donald Nam/. Norma 
Nelson. 




C47] 



z 





f*\ 




Q 


jli 




■ 


*"» 




3: 


I 




jg 



Row One; Edward Ralph, Oleda Sallander, Marian Rudow, Kenneth Schank. 
Row Two: Duane Payleitner, John Rudow. Robert Swanson, Donald Racthcr. 

Rote Thrcr: Dick Sutton. John Postman. Donald Pederson, Edwin Schattschneidcr. 



Ron One: Warren Thomas, Ruth Thomas. Florence Carlson, Paul Partrids 

Row Two: Shirley Soderberg, Beverly Rusdal, fean Schwalbe. 

Row Three: Clyde Schwellenbach, Theodore Tischke, Clifford Sorensen, Douglas Sherman. 




C«D 




Ron One: Helen Tirpak, Audrey Vigerust, fean Sterner, Jean Welch. Phyllis Walsh. 
Row Two: Francis Valley, Paul YadTosky, George Zimmerman, Robert Weiland, Robert 

Yorkston. 
Row Three: James Hohn. Liu re n \'an Loon. Selvin Zabel, Roger Winberg, Lowell Tuft. 



C^3 




Ha* Pat teen this. Mai lool^ what I got. Roen's Rhythm Boy's, A Dogpatch Capture, Eager Beavers. "400" Club Special. 




Class of '50 



President 
ROBERT SIMON 



I 






President 
GERTRUDE PROVOST 



, 



A \ 







Secretary 
FRED WENTORF 



Treasurer 
PEGGY WELCH 



/ 



Sophomore Class 



The Sophomore Class was very busy this last year with various social tasks given them by the 
S.S.A. Their first task was decorating the town for homecoming. This was cleverly accomplished by 
painting store windows, hanging signs ai strategic points, and finally decorating the goal posts in ap- 
propriate colors. The class also entered a float in the parade. 

This class was the one responsible for the decorations used at the Christmas dance. These decora 
lions were so cleverly arranged that the Freshmen assigned to clean up were a little dismayed ai their 
task. 

To }>ut .1 relaxing thought to their work, they concluded the year with a combined picnic and 
dance to the utter enjoyment of all Sophomores who had helped make '47-*48 a great school year. 



HSU 




Row One Doris Pickering, lanicc Pcgorsch, Kathleen Welch. Mildred Schucts. 

Row Tito; Pcggi< Boetccher, William Bailey, Lee Bedsced, Robert I Melva Madsen. 

Row Thnc: Robert Babick. Richard Dunne. Arland Bocttchcr. William Amthor. Milton 

Boldt. Jerome Zclenka. 
ROW Tour: Paul Axclscn. Robert Hanna, John Anderson. Edwin Binstock. RobeH Becker. 

Wallace Bondhus. Bert Boctchcr. 



Ron One: Marjoric Hckstein, Norma Cole, Alice Fechner. Eileen DeetZ. 

Row Two: Howard Michalsen. Gloria Clay. Ruth Ann Christcnscn. Carol Brack. Glenn 

Brodin. 
Row Three: William Fehrenbach. Edwin Ebert, John Calder, (it-raid Cook. 
Row Four: Robert Christianson, Sherman Dreyer. Earl IXhne. Robert Crowley. Robert 

Cairns, i lar\ey Bcr^huis. 




C52] 




Row One: Nancy Glenn, Aiken Flanagan, Marilyn Erickson, Eleanor Erickson. 

Row Two: (Jerry Erickson, Marvin Fricbel, John English, Gerald Gappa, Donna Franken. 

Row Three: David Hoffman, Donaid Gee, Jim Emerson. Lloyd Engen, Lloyd Ganm 

Warren Fish. 
Row Four: Gerald Grcischar, William Albrechl. Robert Grundsted. Donald Fahrman. 

Warren Eiseth. 



Row One: Dorothy Huley. Patricia Gardiner. Arlene Harck, Helen Helm. 
Row Two: Lynos Hendrikson. Bette 1 lover. Robert Houg. Robert Hcndrickson. 

Three: Virgil Halverson. David Hart/.ell. Glenn I Ieisa. Bernard Fisher. 
Ron Four: Russell Gerbcr. Rodne\ Hanson, lohn Hall, William Hehli. 




C53D 




Row One: Klaine M. Johnson. Paticia [ones, Shirley Johnson. Marilyn Kelly. 

Row Two: Lewis Jackson, Ruth Johnson. Virginia Johnson. Ruby Jarman, Lila Nelson. 

Row Thru. George fenssen, Richard V. Johnson. Warren Ayers, William Josephson, Mat- 
thew Janiak. 

Row Four. Richard A. Johnson. Richard (". Johnson, Donald Braun, Richard Hunsbuscher, 
John I lummel. 



Row One: Janis Oebser, Janet VogI, Carolyn Ingham, Joyce Meyer. 

Row Tuo: Carol Radtke, Madelyn Erickson, Irene Riedel, Ellen McGarty, Norman I. emus. 

Row Three: Laurence Klcvcn. Mary I loehn. Rosalie Orth, Alice Mott. Ardelle Knutson. 
Russc! Larson. 

Row Tom. Kenneth Krohn. Rolxrt Langhorne, Duane Lebegue, Gene Landgraf, Ri 
Landgraf. 




C50 




Ron One Dolores Lanners, Arddle I ' Proline Lanzer, Lillian Krcbs. 

Rou Tun Milt. Miller. Ardelle Krueger, Frances Knighi, Karen Nielsen, Patricia Grob, 

John Lurquin. . , 

Ron Three: Don.,!,! Lux. Ronald Morlcy, Robert Morlcy, Robert Lynch, LeeMcPhci 
Foui Myron Lindgren, Leonard Minarik, Robert Han,.,:. Paul Merrill, Joseph Mays. 



Ron One: l>ar: Margaret Pccry. 

Two: Mann Madsen, Amelia Matetich, Lois Quia, Gordon Nooycn, Phyllis Ban 
Ron Three: nincr Ohr. Arthur Oettmeier. Sadao Kishimoto, i son, Emen 

In::. Vcron Reseland, Merlin Moore, fohn Plank, Marvin Lundin, Rolxrt Mackin. 




r^] 




One: Gertrude Provost, Marvel Oelke, Beth Robertson, Dolores Pirlot. 
Ron- Tuo: Kathleen Norton. Ruth Kuchner, Grace Watson. 

Three: Arthur Piner, Neil Palmer, William Pctryk, William Richardson. 
Row Four: Homer Settles, Warren Richter, Richard Roepke, Warren Phillips. 



Row One Gerald Solie, Harold Satterlund, Owen Reppert, Dale Sievert, William Heinkel. 

Ron Tuo: Paul Kunz. Joseph katacinich. Robert Sipple. Daniel Jeatran. Gordon Was- 
inger, Maurice Schneck. 

Ron Three: Arnold Potthast, Richard Roen. Fred Wentori. Edward Maurer. Francis 

Stephens. Paul Vctter. 
Row Tour: Roland Sealer. John Yount. John Poellingcr, Otto Carlson, Donald Rheid. 
Lloyd Johnson. 




C56] 




Row One'. Lorinne Swift, Ruth Sandahl, Verle Sneen, feanne Sand. Grace Snow. 

Row Two: Violet Schmidt. Alvera Missling. Janet Rottjcr, Naomi VVcndt, Rosclla Trangs- 

rud. 
Row Three-: John Kuula. William Sporter, Charles TibbettS, Jack VanDien, Howard 

Trickey. 

Row Four: Lynn Robinson, Marlyn Tibbetts. Wallace Schwellcnback, David Tank. Nor 
bcrt Schell. 



Row One: Doris Struton, Jean Wah/.er, lean Winsor. Gerr} [uowitZ. 

Rou Two: Glen Sommers, Lee Sexe, Sister Mary Pilocea, I-Vl., Florence Severson, Joe 

Wangen. 
Row Three: Lawrence Themmes, Fred Ward. Gerald Slind. Rolland Sullivan, Ray Walker. 
Row Tour: Douglas Wagner. Albert Pomper, Werner Schmidt, William Owen. Herbert 

Watanabe. 




[57] 




lladdons Hash House. Quiet! mad printers at uot\. Indian gettum squaw. Has Earl Carroll seen this? Captured in 
the wilds of Lynwood. .Any gossip around girls. The lure at l.\ : Open House. 



C583 




Class of '51 



President 
ED PRAHL 

Secretary 
PAT WILSON 

Treasurer 
BEVERLY WENTLANDT 



K 



Fresh 



man 



Class 



The Freshmen class has been active in many school events. Their lirst effort .is .i group was the 
gathering of material and construction of one of the highest bonfire's in Stout's history. This was a 
difficult task because the hoys had to go out of town t gel enough material to give it the proper 

touch. While the hoys were engaged in construction the girls were working on the homecoming lloat. 
This class was on the job to make the 1947 homecoming a big success. 

The Freshmen were assigned to dean up after the all school homecoming dance which is also 
a traditional job for them. The class also took it upon themselves to decorate the gym for the mid- 
semester mixer and they kept in harmony with the spirit of the school .\m\ placed large report cards 
on the walls, giving the class marks for all extra curncular activities. 

To conclude an active school year the class held a jovial freshmen picnic in May. 



C593 




Row One: Dorothy Arnault, Jean Buerger, Isabel Benedict, Carolyn Blain, Alice Billiet, 

Ann Hanker. 
Row Two: Levcrne A Ward. Henry Ayahe. Warren Barlxrg, Gregory Chang, Allen A|xl, 

Dave Blissett. 
Row Three: Lester Duenk, Richard Alexander. Vcrn Ader. Ralph Amis. Laurence Bohn, 

Richard Ammerman. 
Row Tow: Edgar Davidson. Bruce Bayer. William Balleniine. AKin Berchcm, Donald 

Braem, Rolx-rt Andrewski. George Bard. 



Row One: Doris Eckstein. Jean Carswell. Pamona Graykowski. Carol Cray, Grace Dartsch, 

Rosemary Gocde, Shirley Cox. 
Row Two: Shirley Chipman. Bernice Danzinger, Marilyn Ulxr, Carolyn Busk. Mildred 

Danielson. Pat Dodge. Ruth Conjutske, Rachel Dautermann. 
Row Three: Howard Greening, Janus Gehrke. John Dorr. James Covey. Casimer Brczczo- 

wicz, Dan Gamitsch, Byron Dodge. 
Row Tour: Lavcrnc Burns. Murnice Dallman, Allan Engen, Edward Dittmer, Armin 
Gerhardt, Donald Chartraw, Donald Greisbacb. 



C*0D 





Row One: Wmcy Haerdein, Shirley |aeger, Phyllis Hoag, Maralic Gchri, Marion Hcn- 
derson, Ruth I louge. 

Ron- Tito: Rosemarie Hartmann, Mary lean Swanson, Dorothy Groethe, Janice Vaughn, 
Priscilla Jedlicka, Mary Lou Groom, Frances Fiedler, Lois Heike. 
Three: John Hegge, fames Heller, Bob Heller. Rodney Horky, Byran Hagcn. Emil 
( Slaser, Daniel Gordon. 

Rou Tour: Gordon Goessner, Russell Gabriel, Ray Fulwiler, I^cc Flanders. Robert Hough- 
ton. Tom Jacobson. Robert dross. 



Row One: Peggy Kelch, Audrey Kramer. Lois [ensen, Barbara Jeanne Lovering, Dorothy 

I«arson, Barbara Johnson. 
Row Tito: Sister Marj Bertilia, Ruth Larson, Joan Kleinheinz, Lorraine I^irson. ( 

Lison. Faye Lchner. \*i r^jil King, Charles Jorgcnscn. Jr. 
Row Three: Lorton Layman, Bohumil Holub. Harry Hill. James Haas. Larry LePean, 

Robert Draeger. 
Rou Tour: Irvin Lathrop. Wayne Koehlcr. Alyn Larson. Don Krueger, Takeshi Hirano. 

Melvin Kell, James Hamilton. 




I>l 1 




Row One: Pal Nelson. Carrol Molner, Marlys Quilling, Kay Mathews, Catherine Me- 
nu. 
Two: Ed Prahl, Florence Pleszczynski, Marlys Metling, Mary Reid, Laverne Met; 
Marilyn Olstad, Robert Man 
Rou Thin. Richerd Reichow, Francis Pratt, jr.. Don Winters, Rob Nelson, Donald 

O'Brien, Lewis Mallow, Robert Mattson. 
Row Four: Willard McCarthy, Russ Pollock. Glen Mattison, Donald Rhead, Will Malone, 
Edward N'vlund. 



Row I >iu Dale Sherburne. Louise Tabbert, Ron Marie Staats, Ruth Schrader. Herbert Par 

sons. 
Row Tito: Akir.i Takahama, Rob Rublee, Rob Penning, Pete Schellinger, Roger Randall. 

Hiroto Taono. 
Row Thin Ben Sperstad, Duane Sievert, Harter Peterson. Edmund Paul, Ardean Sveum, 

David Pilon. 
R-,:i Four: Ros> Slater. Ken Sorensen, Lauren Norman, William Weisheipl, Henry Tall. 

William Sipplc. 



C62D 





Row One: Betty Sontag, Kathryn Thurston, Elizabeth Severson, Barbara Pcch, Barbara 

Winn, Marianna Zdrazil. 
Row Two: H. Walter Weiss, Ruth Voss, Betty Potthast, Ruth Willman, Beverly Went- 

landt, Geraldine Raisler, Dorothy Krushas, Garth Wilcox. 
Row Three: Eugene Weigel, William Vreeland, Galen Quaderer, Charles Wise, Warren 

Wold, Clarence Urankar, Curtis Peterson, Gerald Wesdund. 
Row Four: Eugene Traxler, Marshall Steel, Thomas Runstrom, Wayne West, Eugene 

Wolske, fames Vogtsberger, Donald Tietz, Robert Young. 



Row One: Gordon Beste, Bettylue Gibson, Martha Ann Lee, Gar) Chang. 
Two: Ruel Fleming, Charles Thomas, Hartzel Ford. 

Row T/vrc: Paul Olson. Glenn Brooks. Reed Curtis. Edward Wagner. 




i: 63 i 




RjCjf| 









Haven't / seen this before. That's no Halo over my bed. Registration Day. They rvalue good wives — girls. Fund's out 
for lunch. No /-t/^r Hanging now. 

[64] 




Organizations 



< 

in 



President 
WALTER DUSOLD 



Stout Student Association 



Vice-Presi< 

ROBKRT SWAN'S- >\ 



;ary 

BETH ROBERTSON 



In 1928, .in attempt to set up .1 student government at 
Stout was .u last realized. The new organization, known as 
the Stout Student Association, was set up to promote a spirit 
of school co-operation and to secure tor students a definite 
mu\ responsible vote in school affairs. Every student, upon 
enrolling, automatically becomes a number and receives 

weekly StOUtoniaS, a copy of the Tower, and an activity 
ticket. This activity ticket entitles him to admission to all 
concerts by student musical organizations, to play produc- 
tions ot the Manual Arts Players, to iyceum and assembly 
programs, and to student dances. Four student execul 
who are elected by the student body, represent the students 
before the administration. 

This year the S.S.A. has Sponsored six dances: the Hall 
Ail-School mixer, the two Homecoming dances, the Christ- 
mas dance, the Mid-Semester All-School mixer, and the 
r Frolic. 



Treasurer 

WALLACE HAMMERBERC5 



C66D 




•"K 




Student Governing Board 



The student governing board, which is composed of both faculty and student members, has 
served its first full year. The primary job of the board has been the revision of dorm rules and their 
installment. It has helped also in the revision of the student handbook, the revision of the p ini sys- 
tem for students engaged in extra-curricular activities, and the revision of student government pro- 
visions into the constitutions. The board also has assisted in formulating the procedure in handling 
the problems of students who cut classes. The student governing board is always glad to aid any 
student who needs help or counseling mu\ it is willing to be mediator for any student who has a 
problem which net a meeting with any of the faculty or administration. 



Mr. Arneson, adviser; Miss Antrim, adviser; Robert ■ Beth Robertson, Mr. Price, adviser. Ron '/.•<<.: Hel 

Wallace Hammcrbcrg. Melvin Lemon, Jim Bailey. Frank Tank. 




[67] 




D 



■ 



**~ 



CARLTON ERICKSON 



I HI /' 

ROBERT WEILAND 




LAWRENC1 WRIGHT 



.•Treat. 
WARDCOWI.ES 



Epsilon Pi Tou 



.on Pi Tau is an international honorary, professional fraternity in industrial education and industrial vocational edu- 
cation. The symbolic triangular gold key represents the skillful use of life's tools, the social efficiency needed to work with lel- 
lowmen for profit to one's profession, and the research which inspires men to solve problems logically and to search for new 
truths. The members ol Thcta Chapter are chosen on the basis of possession and growth in these precepts. 

Stimulation is gained through regular meetings of the organization, two open professional contributions, a held trip, and 
award for outstanding work, and Christmas and spring parties. 

ti !>:. I. I . R.n. Mr. R. F. Kr.m/iisvh. Raymond Cornwdl. Ward Cowlcs, Carlton ! ('. \. Bowman, Roinrt Weiland ( Roix.n Swan 

ion, [oscph Bcrtoletti. Row Two'. William Hornbeck, Lyman Be K >i«. Stephen (."rutlicluk. Willard Bens* n, G - Zimmerman, Don 

nerley, Warrm Thomas, Kenneth Shank. Richard Hamilton. Rot, risen, lacqucs Beers, Gibson Van Patter. Bruce Thompson, Mr. (. 

S<Klcrrxr>;. Mr. I. A. Jarus. Robert Thomas, Melvin Lemon, Robert Ruidgrr, Omer Bcnn. / Mr. S. Anderson, Gordon Lindberg, Robert Keller 

man. |a:ncs Rockwell, Richard Suti n. Noi Wato n, Mi ek, Mr, '. C Brown, Donald Lippold. William R.<nj:. Ron' Five: Mr. I>. 1' 

Barnard, Kenneth Wold, Eugene Dyke, Waller Hammerberg, Roland Kehrbcrg. John Postman, Phillip Ruehl, Walter Dusold. Raymond Hanks. 
Partrii 




Z*»l 





MARJOR1E THULL 



CAROL WINDER 



MIRIAM 



ll \\ CANTRELL 



Phi Upsilon Om/cron 



The Tau Ch iDtei i psiloo Omicron. a national honorary professional home economics fraternity, has completed an- 

ether v ear filled « designed to carry out the aim ol anization: pro ™? 

p^hofal horned 
rowtn >i nomc 8tu d eMS sendinc i textile box to home economics teachers in the state, and publishing a pro 

x^\:^t^:!::: \ is* ,.,.,, * . «*, ,,., .,„>, ,,.>„„„., „, . « , ....„,, 

with Epsilon Pi Tan. 











GORDON w. LINDBERG 

Vice President 
CLARENCE MERKLEY 



Alpha Psi Omega 



Inspired by the Little Theatre movement, the Manual Arts Players 
was organized in 1921 to promote an appreciation of all chi 
Today its members strive to develop a taste for the best dramatic liter- 
ature, to attain a certain degree of acting ability, and to train for fu- 
ture activity by participating in or directing amateur dramatics. Anj 
student having fulfilled satisfactorily the requirements for points 
gained through acting and crew work may become a member upon 
approval ol a majority of tin group. 

This year M.A.I', presented the very successful performances of 

"The Wedding" -is a major event of the Homecoming weekend. 
Building ol a i. r\ was made possible this year by the 

appropriating of the funds. The production ol the play and 

the building oi new scenery gave interested students an opportunity 
to earn part ot the points required for admittance into the fraternity. 




Secretary 

SHiRi.n SCHNITZLI R 

Treasurer 
DUANF LAI 



Rom One: Shirl M G >n Lirulix-rjj. Belt) k u |d, Jeanne Greenlee. Ron . 

Egert, Richard Hamilton, Miss l rkkson, adviser; Raymond Christman, Harold Suuter!an<l. Rou Three: Jack Postman, Duanc Lebeguc. 




t: :<> j 




Kappa Phi Sigma 



"When the Whiffcnpooi assemble . . ." has become the (heme 
song ot the Kappi Phi Sigma, social fraternity tor men students, 

whenever they hold parties or serenade the women's dorms during 
semi-annual pledging The chap wearing the straw hat. 

K.I-'.S. sweater, and carrying a paddle and cane is a typical pledge 

initiated into K.I'.S. during "Hell Week." 

Organized in 1931 to promote knowledge, friendship, and 
life lor men. K.F.S. continued its annual industrial education tour 
this year during which trat members conducted home economics 
women through the buildings on the other "side ot the street." Each 
year to promote scholarship and skill. K.I-'.S. gives a scholarship to a 
worthy man student. 

"To be remembered*' events among K.F.S. social activities are a 
winter and a spring dinner dance, an alumni breakfast at homecoming, 
and stag nights. 




President 
Mhl.VIN LEMON 

Viet President 
i REEMAN ( 



Set Mat \ 
RDGAR Ross 

Treasurer 
PAUL HALVERSON 



Ron One: Edgai Ron, Mr. R. Bctterlcy. Melvin Lemon. Freeman Galoff, Paul Halvcrson, Arvin Ahlr. Rom Two: William Bailey, Kenneth 
Carlton Erickson, Donald Lippuld. Richard C. |i>hnv>n. Irving Christcnsen, Jerome Alt. Gordon S'ooycn. Row Three: Rogci Winbcrg, James Bruno, 
rcn Richter, Richard R<in. Yjughn Stai, Jerome Larson. Robert Sipple, Eugene Dyke, Louii Burmebtci ur: Rogei Landgraf. Carroll Brusen, 

II, Eugene Landgraf, Lowell Tuft, Jam* lames Bailey, Joseph Bertoletti. Donald l'-m^born. 




I'M 




President 
JACK GOODRICH 

Viet I 
NORMAN WATSON 



Secretary 
PARNIK HAZARIAN 



aila 



P/i/ Omega Beta 



Phi Omega Beta is the oldest men's social organization at Stout, taking an active ini 
in all school activities but showing a major interest in athletics. F.( ).!». has the singular distinc- 
tion ot' being, perhaps, the only college men's organization in the country to be founded in a 
women's dormitory. F.O.B. was rounded in the recreation room of Lynwood Hall in 1927. when 
still .1 residence for women students. 

F.O.B. has the reputation ot supporting social functions and its members can h< 

wearing traditional derbies. The fraternity also sponsors various all-school activities where 

everybody is guaranteed .1 good time. 



OM1 R 



Ron One: Ra; t'. lohnson, advuor; i»-:> Rudiger, Omcr Bcnn, |ack Goodrich, Norm v. 

Icr. Hill Young, K Scita, Don Ivcrson, Dick Hamilton. Row Three: Ralph Smii rhompson. Bob DuChai 

|«.hn Rudow, Arnie Potthast. Ron rd) Lindberg, Ra) Pittman, Roger Erickson, Dick Robertson, Bill Hchli, |<>hn Ti Fir*: 

Walt i ill) Hammcrberg, Dick [catran, Fred Wcntorf, Hill Amthi 




C72D 



Sigma 





Pre/idem 
ROLAND KRHRBERG 



GEORGF i: 




•^* JCZ:- '. 



Sigma, a relativel) new organization, has contributed favorably to our college life here at 
Stout. Sponsor ol the annual "Tacky Drag," that was quite an occasion, the organization is 
prominent in support oi the activities ot the college union which is supported and to which it 
contributed substantially. The fraternity is a conscientious one and any student can recognize 

.1 Sigma pledge by the large red sash they are required to wear at all times. The sincerity 01 the 
organization is evident in its aim: to promote social and educational lite in the col'ege and in 

the lives oi fraternity members. 




try 

HALVOR CHRIST1ANSON 

I retuurer 

KOI. AND EHART 

Row Out. Dr. Octting, Gcorgi Tincttc, Ronald limn. Roland ktl>rlxr>:. Halvor Christcnson, Dr. Agncw. Row lu->: Waller Vernon. |<x Mocogni, 
Edward lUirnv. Paul Axclson, Gcrhardt NVK-.n. Richard Kurshinsky, Km -i Haucke. Row Three: Harvcj Peterson, Edward Ralph, Robert Thompto, 
Maurice Schneck, Rolxn Jackson, Lyn Kingsley. Row Four: LcRo) Parson*, IX>nald Racthcr, fames Lanfte. Donald Rabst. William Snyder, Raj Doane. 





DOUGLAS SHERMAN 



lice /'■ 
<.K)R(,l ZIMM1 RMAN 






Hirer 
WARREN THOMAS 



Phalanx 



Although a young organization in only its second year, Phalanx has begun to take its place among the progressive 
organizations ol the school. Membership has grown from last year's fifteen charter members to the present twent) four. 

ocial [functions were staged for members, the.r guests, and tor the student body. The highlights of the 

Phalanx year wen the hall Fantasy ami the Pre Prom dinner. 



M , ,, .. *on Van Patter. D rman, Duan , Warren Thonuu, Mr. J. A. larvi, Ron Two: 

Three: Robert Thorn,,, Kenneth! 
«r. Richard Hogstad. Duan, ben Krudichak. J 




C74 3 



Intersociety Council 



Existing as the governing body of the four women's societies, the [ntersocietj Council 
is composed ot the president and secretary of each society, together with the four advisers 

and the dean ol women. The group meets once a month to discuss relevant social rules and 

>uch school events which the organizations sponsor as the stocking dance, the [ntersociet) 

rushing parties lor all freshmen women, and the gala winter Intersociety Ball, held in the 

early part ol December. The Intersociety Council has proved to be a valuable organization 
by seeing that society affairs run smoothly and by keeping all lour societies it: ndly 

contact with each other. 



Rosann Bongey, Helen Tirpak, Norma Nelson, Beverly Rusdal, Roscmar) Olbcrt, Miss Lillian |eler, Aileen Slocumb, Miss Hazel 

Van Ness, Miss Amu Marshall. AW Three: Miss Kcturah Antrim, Shirlc) Erickson, |eanin< Sterner, Miss Marjorit Lcland. 




[75] 







Secretary 
ROSI MARY OLB! R1 



ROSANN BONGEY 



CAROL WIDDER 




■ urcr 
PATRICIA MOORE 



Pallas Athenes 



Amid the sparkles of many diamond rings, the Pallas Athenes began a busy year. October was far from being bleak! 
Our homecoming float was judged the most beautiful of all. Formal initiation at the La Pointc home was also the occasion 
of introducing our adviser, Dr. Anne Marshall. The serenade added a traditional note to the month. 

Dancing at the all-school Snow Brawl alter the first basketball game ol the second semester ollercd students opportunity 
to meet many new acquaintances. 

With the coming of spring, our Easter sale and Ma) Da) Ided their bits of sunshine. The informal dinner al 

Thanksgiving, mid-year graduation, founder's day, and Kaster were happy occasions. A senior dinner climaxed four ha 
years With our graduating sisters. 

Ron One: K..-i Mar) Olbert, Patricia Moore. Rotann Bongey. Carol Widdcr. I . Marilyn Hi Vivo Dorii Strccton, Florence S 

i. Joj Mcrkley. Dr. Anne Marshall. Gertrude I le Anderson, Lucille Lii Harriel Okuyama, Mariam TcBecst, |cann< 

Greenlee. Audre) Vigerust, Dons Counsdl. Phsllis Walsh. A Betty Kunz cln. C Virginia |"lin«»n. Kathryn G 

vcl Oelke. 




C76 3 




■ 



Pre/idem 
NORM \ Ml SON 




Set reiary 
II an STERNER 



SMA. 



Treasurer 
RUTH NEUMAN 



For the ever-active S.M.A.'s, tins year has Ken busy and prosperous. We started tin- year off right, initiating thirteen 
new members. This year tin- S.M.A. was well represented among the officers ol the Home Economics Club and also among 
the officers ol the S.S.A. 

S.M.A. Jean Sterner reigned as the Homecoming Queen, and other S.M.A.. Ruth Christianson. was in the court. 
\\ a whole the activities were numerous: social gatherings, dinners, hikes. Sadie Hawkins Week with all the events, and 
tin highlight ol the year, our dinner dance. 

Row One: Miss |eter, Rut'i Neuman, Norma Nelson, lean Sterner, Pcgg) Welch. Ron /»<<•. Ruth Knowlcs, Marian Rudow, Bettc ll"\cr. W ill.* Rayburn. 
Mar) Goodrich, Audrey Harlander. Row Three: Virginia lackson, lean Cyr, Mar) Lou Ott, Marjoric Kcllerman, Dorii Eckstein, Lois Chamberlain, 
Wilma Loomaiu. Rou Four: Jean Welch, Vcrlc Snecn. Ruth Christenscn, Mar) Rudow, Helen Quilling, Marjorw Eckstein. Row Five: Alio Oates, 
Mtth Robertson, Ester Medtlic. Patricia Houle. 




C77] 





President 
SHIRLEY F.RICKSON 

Vice President 
OLEDA SALLANDER 



Philomotheons 



The Philomatheans began their social activities of the year by 
sponsoring the traditional Philo Phrolix dance, which was given tol- 
the tirst football game of the u 

of the tall were the Halloween Tea. the Philo alumni 
breakfast given at the Evangelical Church, pledging ceremonies for 
new members, a Christmas corridor sale, and a Christmas dinner. 

The Spring pledging ceremonies and the dinner dance climaxed a 
busy and memorable year. 

The Philomatheans society was organized in 191a as a woman's 
lilerar\ society and is the oldest social organization at Stout. Today 

the organization provides an active social program in addition to its 

interest in yood literature. 




Bl VERLY GIKUNG 
HF.LEN MELVILLE 



Ron Out oic.l.i Sallander, Hcl< n K cumb. Row Two: Alice McVicar, Margaret Beitagnelli. P 

Marge Thull Mar) Lundin. (can Kelton. Virginia Schrimpf, Margaret Pceryi Ida Sautter. Ron Four: Irene Rcidcl fran* 

rud. Jean Schwalbe, N ick. 




C783 





HI I.I \ TIRPAK 




Ury 
HKVERLY RUSDAHL 



Treasurer 
OLIVE BROU 



The Hyperions 



The Hyperians started the year out by participating in the homecoming celebration. The annual breakfast in honor of 

alumni was belt! in the Tea Room. For the rushees they had a "Circus Party" featuring bingo, a tun house, clow:: 
refreshments. At the December student assembly, the Hyperians presented their "Split Personality" dance. The original aim 
ot the as expressed this year in making stuffed toys lor the children ot" Menc monic at Christmas. A "Splash Par: 

given tor the other societies on February 28. The Saint Patrick's Day dance really brought out the or better yet the 

"Irish" on the campus. 

Bcvcrl) Rusdal, Helen Tirpak. Jeanne Gon*olii wneU. Ron/ Tu . hrmann, Ruth Samdahl, Icannc Sand, Miu Lcland. Doris 

Brin* inni, Janet Ocbu Mueller, Ardclle Knutaon, Mary Lou Pril 

tcrkircii. (can Camrell, Vcrena Price. [and Rotm-r. Ht-Un Kdly. Norma Cole, Carol Brack. Lois «.)aist. Maxinc Pence, Maxim 




: 79 j 



Home Economics Club Council 



\ home economics student is a member of the I lome Economics Club. The local 
club is affiliated with the State and National Home Economics Association. In 1024 the 

nization was organized to develop professional spirit, to improve social and educational 

activities, and to keep students in close touch with important organizations in home 
omics. 

year the club sponsors a corridor dance for new students, the Yule KalTe Lai 
a farewell hreaktast ror senior women. Delegates from Stout are sent to the province, 
and national Home Economics Association Convent 



Ron M in, Norma Nelson, |cann< Grcenli M Kaihrjrn Go mdalc, Mr*. Nicbaucr. Dr. Kirk. Harriei 

vama. Ruth Ntum.m. 





c so : 



President 
ARTHUR BAETZ 

i ice Pit 
IAMES BAILEY 



Set retary 
V.W CORNWELL 







Stout Typographical Society 

The Stout Typographical Society, which is affiliated with the National Printing Guild 
and the Stout Printing Teachers' Association, was organized in 1926. Its aim is to promote 
fellowship among the nun majoring in the graphic arts, to analyze problems confronting 
teachers of printing, and to stimulate the desire for additional knowledge of these .irts, 
Membership is divided up into three degrees or units: apprentice, journeyman, and mas 
ter; advancement through these stages is based on additional study and examination. The 
S.T.S. has furnished printed material lor all student activities and promotes, among other 
projects, its annual held trip which gives members the opportunity to visit schools and 
commercial printing shops throughout the midwest. 




Treasurer 
KDDIF MUELLER 



r; John Kaiser, Ray Cornwcll, Aithiu* Bactz, Louis Below, Edward Burns. />« Two'. R<>!kh Blaoing, !.l«.\<l Ganncgan, lack Bongcy, Ward 
Cm It>. Row Three: Dick fohnson, Richard Dunne, Richard Maliszcwski, Mr. Bak< r. advisi r. Ron Foui Mr, Carlsen, advisi r: Mr. Barnctt, adviser; Paul 
Vxclson, Robert Cairns. 




[813 



Y.W.CA. 

The oldest organization tor women students at Stout and the oldest club of its kind in the state of Wisconsin is the 
Young Women's Christian Association. The need ot' an organization to lead in the social and religious life of women 
students was met in 1912 by the establishment of the V.W.c.A. Many of its activities, however, are designated t<> serve the col- 
lege and the community. Among these are the campus sister movement, the annual sunrise services, help for the needy families 
of Menomonie, and, for a climax, the senior picnic. Most important though, is the opportunity tor religious expression and 
growth which the V.W.C.A. provides tor women students at The Stout Institute. 



OFFICERS OF V.W.c.A. 



President 

Vice President 
tary 
asurer 



Dorothy Kopp 
Marvel Olke 

ElAINI [OHNSON 
|i \\ WlNSOR 



One: lean Winsor, Marvel Oclkc, I)«.r..ili> Kopp, Elaine M. fohnson, Barbara Johnson. K»u Two: Miss Trullingcr, Kaj Thurston, Bene Severson, 
Zona Rac Hines, Shirk) Cox, Miss McCalmont. Row Three: Patricia Nelson, Patricia (ones, lean Waltzcr, Shirlc) Schnitzler, Mildred Hanson, Lillian 
Krebs. Row \'<>u> Alvcra Missling, Janet Rottier, Barbara Peck, Carolyn Blain, Francis Fiedler, Ruin |arman, |can Sherman. Row Five: Mar) Lou Groom, 
Marilyn Ubcr, Noami Wendt, Carolyn Bush, Delorcs Eggelbre Maxim Pci 




CM] 




President 
GIBSON VAN PATH R 



^^\ v 




Vice /'- 
LOWELL TUFT 



Seen 
MF.LVIN OLSON 



Treasurer 
F.UGF.NE DYKE 



Arfs one/ Cra/fs 



The Stout Arts and Crafts club is comprised of students and faculty members who are interested in hobby and crafi 
work. Each member has an opportunity to work with any craft medium in which he is interested. Through it\ activities, the 
Arts and Crafts club promotes the worthy use of leisure time and gives its members an Opportunity to learn about the or- 
ganization and function ol Craft clubs. 

Ron Our: Dorothy Thompson, Mclvin Olson, Eugene Dyke, Gibson Van Patter, Mr. Kr.ui/iiMli. adviser. Rom Two: Richard Maliszcwski, Bruce 
Thompson, Gordon Lindberg, Ray Cornwcll, Rolx-n Thomas, Warren Thomas. Row Three: Walter Vernon, Freeman GalofT, Jacques Beers, Harold 
Osborn, William Roerig, Stephen Grudichak. Row Four: Carlton Erickson, Lyman Berg, Russel Hall, l>>mal«l Lippold, Elmer Rudigcr. Row Five: [ames 
Rockwell, Victor Hcndrics, Warren Richtit. Omar Bcnn. Douglas Sherman. 




[83] 



% *s*. «■• 



V. 



\ 






I 




Vice Pi 
CLYDI SCHWELLENBACH 



President 
GEORGE i: 



R/We C/ub 



in; LONGO 



The Rifle Club can boasi ng the youngest aaive organization on the campus; however, in reality it is a revival of 

the once very a< Club which disbanded in 

The object ( : the organization is the encouragement ot organized rifle and pistol shooting among citizens of the United 

States, residents <>: our own community, and students ot Stout. Other aims include a better knowledge of the sate handling 
and proper care ot firearms, together with improved marksmanship and characteristics ot honesty, good fellowship, self 
pline. team plan, and self reliance. The Rifle Club is affiliated as a Class A club with the National Rifle Association. 

Phillip LaBorde. |oc Longo. Mr. »rge Tinetti, Kay Welch, Clyde Schwell nest Hauckc. Aha Billict, JeaniK 

: Schmidt. Warren Barbcrg, Margaret Kclch. Row Three: Bohumil Holub, Edward Paul, K. gene Traxler. Neil Palmer, 

. Goi Edward Prahl, William Halgren, John Anderson, Leonard Minarik, Rodnc) Hanson. Donald Fahrman. 

Rurutrom. Ron Five'. Wallace Schwellenbach, William Snyder. Robert Lin.. Henry Peterson, |im Rockwell, ndries. 




c^n 




Vice President 
PAUL KUN2 



President 
BERT ROTNEM 



Radio Club 



PAUL LARSEN 



The Stout Radio Club, although having been organized only one year, has been very active and progressive. Club mem- 
bers have become cramped for spate already in their little radio room above the auto shop. The club has finished building 
their own sending set and has received an amateur license. Many ot" the men who are members have built their own equip- 
ment or have repaired or reworked their standard sets. One of the many opportunities offered by the club is aid to members 

in obtaining an amateur radio license. Anyone interested, it" he has a 1.2 grade point average, can apply tor membership in the 
Stout Radio Club. 

Ron <»!c: Huit.in Rotnem, Paul Larscn, Paul Kim/. Car! Fiyklund, Mr. Kranzusch, adviser. AW Turn <• Hcinemann, Irvin Lathrop, Francis 

Pratt. Robert Christian*.!!. Glen Kr.*.kv. Leslie Sprincmire, Fames Striebcl, Paul K 




C85] 




lot is Bl RMEISTI R 



Bimm 

Kl SSI LL <■! RBI K 



p Editor 
HERBERT w \ I INAB1 



Ail nor 
DWIGHT CHINNO K 




Tower 



"May these pages lx- a pathway to green meadows ol 
st" was the greeting the tirst edition <>t The Stoui In- 
stitute yearbook, published in 1909. Then, as now th 

Mended tO serve as a means through which students 
might recapture memories of the days spent at The Stout 
Institute. N'<t until 1923 did this yearbook become known 
as the Tower. From the little bulletin of 1909, the Tower 
rown into the yearbook which is an annua! publication 
of The StOUt Institute. The Tower, edited by student 
for the students, presents the playtime and workadaj 

The Stout Institute: its keynote is the informality and 
friendly spirit of the school itself. 



jpker 
CLYDE SCHWELLENBACH 



GORDON (.')! SSN1 R 



|UNF EDEB1 R(i 







Cin iila:ion Managet 
SWORTH K 



Typist 
PHYLLIS WALSH 



Sport t Editor 
ROBERT KACKIN 



Typist 
MILDRED PRASE 



Tower Staff 



Herbert Wannabe, Mildred Prate, Louise Burmeister, June Edeberg, Russell <• '-li Goessner, Clydt Sch« 

Mr. Dwighi Chinnock, Robert Mackin. 



bi 


IL 







C87] 




SHIRLEY SCHNITZLER 



Bmineti Manager 
RAYMOND CORNWELL 



Stoutonio 



Each week then- in a grand hustle over in the Stout prim shop as the Stoutonia goes to press. To the Stoutonia tails the 
responsibility oi recording news, features, editorials, and correspondence which may be of interest to the study body, faculty, 

alumni, and other readers. 

Our outstanding issues were the Thanksgiving special, the pre-Christmas edition and the Christmas issue. The two 

Christmas papers each contained twelve pages and each one was enclosed in a red and green co\cr page. 

The Stoutonia is .m important part of the school. To the stall it may represent much hard work, hut it is tun. Mem- 
bership on the stall oilers many opportunities tor a student to gain valuable experience that conforms to journalistic principles 
and practices. 



c««d 




HOB BLAI 



De/i 
DOUG SHERMAN 



in«, Gertrude Provost, Raymond Cornwcll, Shirley Schnitzlcr, William Baker. Ron Rae Hines, |ani 

lean Waltzer, Caroline Lanzcr, Rose Scianni. Ron Thret I illen Dillman, Nancy Haeitlein, )<.m Dillman, Bill Bailey, R<-i Mai 

I Carlsen, Robert Mackin, Beverly Wentlandt, Bettj Sc ><l P. Barnard. Row Five: Dick [ohnson, Kathryn G 

Dcluro ht, |ean Schwalbe. !>•>: 




[893 





Stout Symphonic Singers 



The Stout Symphonic Singers, in its eleventh year, continues to be one 
-out's most active organizations. An unusually busy season saw the 

presentation o! the Messiah at the Christmas concert. 

The climax ol the group's spring lour in April was the appear.it>.. 

the Symphonic Singers in a featured s|x>i at the convention of the Kentucky 
Federation of Music Clubs at Berea. 



HAROLD R. COOK 

Director of Mum The Siont Imtiiuu 



Row <>v.<: |cann< Gonsolin, Rom Km*:, Doroth) Amcndt, Audrc) Harlandcr, Florence Sevcrson, |can Waltzcr, Lois Jensen, Dorii Streeion, I> 

n, Catherine McCarthy, Isabel Benedict, Jean Cvr. / lean Kclton, I..i- Ruth 

Ann Christianson, Helen Quilling, Marlys-Mctling, Prances Knight, Verle Snccn, Mar) Jean Swansc- Welch, Carol 

Widder, Grace Dartsch, Ardellc Knutson, Duns Counscll. Ruth Samdahl, Ruth Larson, lean Wurtz, Rom Mar) Olbert. A'"« I 

ri Barnhan x. Warren Phillips, Harold Osborn, [ames Vorgtsberger, B >S Ic, R.i> Doanc, |i G G Zim- 

merman. Bill Bailey. Row Five: . Laverne Burns, John Rowe, Kenneth Darling, Bill Halgren, Earl Dchne, Norman Watson, Bill Si 

Nelson, Paul Olson. Janus Bailey. Virgil King. 




C'><>: 



A Cappella Choir 



I hoii was formally reorganized this year and became the Seoul . 
Choir. This -roup joined the Symphonic Singers and the Menomonic High School ( 
in presenting the Messiah tor the Christmas concert. 

The choir was reoi in 1947 to eliminate the men's and women's j:lce club of 

previous years. The choir helps to develop better tone quality ami voice control of the 
members. 

Amor.- ;ts other activities this year was t g oi hymns in church servi© 

Menomonie. 



'" ! [ : -; r . » Joluuon, Nancy Haerddn. Mdva Mad.cn. M t Pcrman. Ed« 

■' Knt, ' L rtn»nn.Grc> 

*mus. Robert Mai r; John Luiquin. Curt 

Cri*,. R.> Chnsonan, Fame. Bruno, Duanc Lcbcgue, Mariyn Tibbcti th , l',i,, r ; han R 




L""i] 



Stout Bond 



The band was quite in evidence at many Stout events, appearing in an early foil concert and two convocation programs. 
The second semester convocation program featured .1 specialty number by faculty members, always a popular feature with 
1 Ik- students. Revived this year by the organization was a short tour during which members presented programs at several 
out-of-town high schools. 

Under the spirited leadership of Conductor I larold E. Cooke, the hand appeared at pep meetings, at football and basketball 
games, and o! course at the grand Homecoming celebration. A new practice was inaugurated this year by the hand in its 
playing oi several marches anil "Alma Mater" before the heginning of each coin ocation program. Having a fairly complete 
instrumentation, the hand divided into two hands, a "blue" m^\ > "white'* hand, which alternated appearances at basketball 

games and convocations. 



Ron One: Maxim Wura, Grace Snow, Theodon Teschke. [lama Haas, Louise Tabbcrt, Dclores Pirlot, Olive Brownell, Gcralyn Erickson. Row Two: 
Neil Palmer. Carolyn Ingham, William Barberg, Donna Kragh, Clifford Sorc-nv.n. Robert Dracger, Edwin Ebert, Edward Dittmcr, William Bailey, 
Edward Ralph. Lou Quist, Lois Heikc, Emery Nelson, Marilyn Uber, Warren Thomas, Edwin Schattschneidcr. Row Three Russell Gerbcr, I 
Ablard, Marilyn Erickson, Arthur Pincr, Kenneth Darling, Donald Winters, Virgil Halverson, Victor Hcndrics, Lawrence Bohn, Naomi Wendt, Virgil 
King, Dale Sicvert, Donald Bracm. Standing: Donald O'Brien, Curtis Briggs, ''••"' Partridge, R«>Ikt« Becker, John Lurquin, Patricia Gardiner, Earl Dchne. 





vm 




JOHNSON ttUCMO 



Maxinc Wurtz, Bill Rkhardton. Ruth Ann ChrUtianscn, Hill Bailey, Marilyn Uber, Warren Thomas, 
Edwin 1 frlwin Schattschnridcr. Shirley Erickson, Donald Bracm. 



The Stout Orchestra 



The first Stout Institute orchestra, organized by Mr. Pan! Gregg ol Menomonie, was composed of iK members of The 

Stout Institute and Menomonic High School. The present orchestra, consisting of about twenty members, has as its main 
purpose the development ot the musical talents o Each year the orchestra participates in the Baccalaureate and 

Commencement program: it also takes an important part in the annual Christmas program, this year being no exception. 

The orchestra was fortunate to obtain several competent musicians from out-of-town and from the high school to present the 
Messiah in collaboration with the Symphonic Singers and A Cappella Choir to the complete enjoyment of all present. 



[93] 




Infirmary, Formal Initiation of K. FOOS. Behind the scenes "The Wedding." Quiet — Genius at Wo>l{. The finer pis. 
explained. Showing the girls the Ropes. 



[94] 



s 

p 

o 

R 
T 
S 






: 



<. 



w 










FOOTBALL 



Throughout the better part of the I'M" football seas >n, the Stout Bluedevils battled the weather conditions as well 
as their opponents. Extreme weather conditions prevailed for four of their eight games; however, all four <>t them 
were non-conference encounters. 

Stout opened the season on September 20th at Winona, Minnesota. Stout and Winona Stat*. Teachers bat- 

tled to a 7-7 tie on a blistering hot day. 

The succeeding week-ends found Stout back in Mcnomonie entertaining Plattevilie in .1 non-conference game, 
and River Falls in the conference opener for the Bluedevils. Stout and Plattevilie waded through the mud in a de- 
: rain, the game ending in another 7-7 tie. The new Nelson Field was dedicated between the halves ol the Rncr 
Falls game, StOUt going down to defeat 20-0 on their newly lighted, newly sodded held. 

Although they came out on top several times statistically. Stout posted their only dear cut victor) ai Eau Claire 
on October 11, turning back Eau Claire State Teachers colic- 

Stout traveled to Oshkosh for their next game, and were greeted by a blistering hot sun once again, and .1 19-12 

setback at the hands of the Titans. 

La Crosse offered the opposition for Stouts* homecoming game, edging out the Bluedevils 7-6. Stout played their 
best game of the year in this game having the edge statistically, but they were unable to score more than once on the 
hard-fighting Indians. 

Stout dropped their third conference game in four starts at Superior on October 51, Superior State Teachers college 
defeating them 32-7. The Bluedevils rounded out the season at home against Moorhead Teachers' College. The game 
was played on a snow blanketed field and in free/in;: temperatures. Moorhead managed to skid over a touchdown to 

ai the Bluedevils 7-0. 

Head Coach Ray C. Johnson led his gridders again this year, aided by Robert Weld, former Minnesota star. a\k\ 
student coaches Ray Pittman and William Hehli. Ralph Smith contributed his services as manager and Donald Pang- 
born acted as trainer. 

Wallace Hammerberg and Walter Dusold were elected co-captains at the close of the season. Robert Young, sopho- 
more back, and Chester Whykowski. sophomore <:m\. were named on the all-conference squad for the second straight 
year. George Devoe, junior i.\\i\. Harve; ion, junior guard, and Fred Wentorl. sophomore guard, received hon- 

orable mention. Waller Dusold mk\ William dranros represent the only graduating seniors. 



C%3 




_ f -I 






v. _• 

_£ = 

— __ 
U 



= > 



a c/5 



§ ^1 



Zi £ -= 5>- 






§ £ I jh 

§ 1 -j 2" 

— — £ 8, 
J - - «*'§ E 







2 5 5 







cv;: 




nv8] 



BASKETBALL 



'liu- 1947-48 Stoui basketball team played a heavy schedule of nineteen games, eleven of them non 
conference encounters, and were victorious in nine of them. 

Coach Johnson started the season with one returning letterman among .1 group <>i willing p 
pects. The squad practiced diligently and played hard, but they lacked valuable experience and 
height. Although the Bluedevils improved rapidly, they lost 8 ol their first ten games. 

By the time the second semester rolled around, the Bluedevils had hit their stride. Taking full 
advantage of the experience gained in early season competition, and bolstered by the eligibility of 
three new men. Stout won seven of their last nine games. The climax came in the 17th game of the 

u. Stout whipping the conference champions. River Falls, by a score ol 62-51. Another highlight 
of the year was Stout's 79-65 victory over Eau Claire State- Teachers college, their arch rival. 

The Bluedevils defeated all of the conference opponents at least once with the exception ol La 
(aosse. Donald Brcdahl led his teammates in scoring with 183 points, followed by Russell Pollock 
with 168, and Eugene Landgraf with UN points. 



rwi 



Basketball Scoreboard 



45 
45 

42 

56 
34 
52 
54 
$8 



OPPONENTS 

eton 66 

Mary's 62 

Oshkosh 43 

S . Olaf 

loud 5s 

St. Johns U. 78 

Steven's Point 44 

Mich. Tech. >5 

L.i Crosse 

River Falls 



STOUl OPPONENTS 

66 Superior ^ s 

65 

4^ 1 

59 Winona 46 

55 Steven's Point 51 

65 Eau Claire 

62 River Kills 51 

66 Winona 57 
u7 Superior 5> 



Front Ron;: Edward Nylund. Donald Bredahl, Vaughn Stai, Gene Landgraf, Russell Pollock. BacJ( Ron-: Coach Ray 
C. fohnson, William Young, Robert Heller, John Stibel, Wallace Hammerberg, Robcn McKay. William Amthor. 




:i«m»: 




C 101 D 



BASEBALL 



1947-M8 



Row One: Robert Young, Robert Morley, William Younj;. Janus Timmerman, Rue! Fleming, Robert Brim- 

er, Pew Hendrickson, Arnold Wilberg, Kenneth Oda. 
Row Two: Arnold Potthast, fames Doherty, Brightsmen, fames Schellin, Maurice Schneck, Russell Pollock. 

Robert Hannes, John Roue. 
Row Three: Hill Uchli. Raymond Pictman, Eugene Landgraf, William Albrecht, Roben Smith. 1- . 

Weigel. 




C1»2D 



BASEBALL 

The spring of 1947 produced Stout's only conference champions of the year, student coach Wil- 
liam Hehli's baseball nine. The Blucdcvils were victorious in five of their six games, defeating La 
Crosse and Eau Claire twice each, and Splitting a two game series with River Falls. Stout was aided 
in their campaign for the crown by pitching of Neil Maxa. and the hitting of Hill Young and George 
. I e. Harold Robin and Paul Ingwell were the only graduating seniors on the squad. 



1946 -'47 



Fioni Row: Robert Young, fames Timmerman, Paul Ingwell, Frank Valley, Clement Santoski, Lynos Hen« 
drickson. 

Hai^ Ron: John Annis, William Young Georj . < oach William Hehli, Neil Maxa. Arnold Pott- 

hast, Harold Robin. 




li»>: 



GOLF 

The golf team had a fine season in winning 4, losing 2, and tying 1. Stout also gave a good 
count of their ability by placing third in the St.uc Teachers College meet ai Eau Claire, ahead of all 

conference opponents. Lyle Johanson played a consistent game of golf to take second place medalist 
honors. The Hluedevils are looking forward to a fine season next year with their entire squad re- 
turning, including student coach Edwin Kijek. 



Front Row. Francis Perrigoue, Roger Erickson, Roger Windberg. 

Hacl( Row: Harvey Ristow, Edwin Kijek, Fred Plonsky, Lyle [onannson. 




ci.h: 



TENNIS 



Stout's fust post-war tennis squad, composed almost entirely of inexperienced men, was unable to 
win a match this year. However, the team considered it a somewhat successful year by virtue of the 
experience they gained. Student coach (Mill Burtness was the only member of the team lost through 
graduation, his successor had no: been named yet at this writing. 



Front Ron. Gordon Nboyen, Frank Tank, John Houle. 

liii</( Ron : Roland Sv.i-ar. Roger I. unlur.it. Clifford Burtness, Wallace i lammcrberj; 




L'H)5] 




President 
ROBERT YOl N(, 



Treasurer 
ARNOLD POTTHAST 



IICU 



S" CLUB 



The "S" dub, which is comprised of men who have earned their major "S" in varsity sports, showed a definite 
increase in school activities this year. The club promoted a Dad's Day on the football schedule this year, a project 
they hope to make a\\ annual event. Members have given their aid in the intramural program, which was enlarged to 
otTer an opportunity tor more students to participate in athletic games. It is the hope of the "S" cluh members that 
more Students mu\ faculty members will participate in and encourage the intramural sports program. 



Ron One: Mr. Raj Johnson, Harvey Peterson, Fred Wentorf, Robert Young, Robert Simon. Arnold Pottash, Mr. Price. Jim 
Timmerman. Ron Tw: Donald Pansborn, William Petryke, Harder Peterson, Dick Alexander, James Doherty, Kay Heinke, 

lack (ioodrich. Russcl Pollock. Daniel Jcatran. George Norton. Mike Anderson. William C.ranros. William Valley, Bud 

Smith. Rote Three: Raymond Pittman, Edward Kink. Walter Dusold, Wallace Hammerberg, Donald Bredahl, Lyle johon- 
sen, William Hehli, Donald Rhead, Jim Ooley. 




C106] 



W.A.A. 



The Women's Athletic Association of The Stout Institute has .is its chief aim promotion of active participation by 
the women students in recreational activities. 

Organized and unorganized sports were offered tor the members to make possible for them to earn awards. The 
awards in order of their ascending point value .ire the W.A.A. emblem, the "S", and the W.A.A. pin. 

W.A.A. groups from River Falls. Man Claire, and La Crosse were the guests at a "Play Day" here in April. Earlier, 
we were guests of the River Falls and La Crosse W.A.A. 

Our traditional treasure hunt was enjoyed by prospective members early in the fall. Christmas caroling was started, 
a project that may also become a tradition for the club. 

OFFICERS 

President Donna KracH 

Vice President Jean Dolman 

Secretary Gertrude Provost 

Treasurer Ri Til Mary THOMAS 

idviser Miss Miller 



Row One: Zona Rae Mines. Eilleen Dillman, Gertrude Provost. Ruth Thomas, Donna Kragh, lean Dillman, Marian Lemke, 
Margaret Perman, Miss June Miller, adviser; Lillian Krebs. Row Two: Carolyn Ingham. Hetty Severson. Peggy Reich. Pa- 
Nelson, Barbara Johnson. Hetty Achtcrkirch. Bernice Johnson, Dorothy Kopp, Rosann Bongey, Mary Ann Zdrazil. 
Row Three: Dorothy Larson. Ramona Craykowski. La\'erne Ahlard, Dorothy Amcndi. Dorothy Krushas, Caroline Blain. 
Carol Cray. Leona Se\e. Ardclle Krueger. Ellen MacCarty. Carol Molner. Ron Tour: Alvera Missling, Ann Banker, Mildred 

Frase, Bernice Danninger, Hetty Pottast, Rachel Dauterman, Marilyn Erickson, Barbara Peck. Faye Lehner, Marian Henderson, 
Ruby Jarman. Donna Franklin, Jean Sherman. Ron Five: Janet Rottier, Florence Pleszczynski, Mar) Lou Groom, fanice 
Vaughn, Ruth Kircker, Delores Eggebrecht, Caroline Husk, Alice Billiet, Gloria Clay, Kathleen Norton, Eileen Deitz 
Edeberg. 




C107 3 




Do tie have fun, has Spi/(e Jones seen this. Go Slott , Curves ahead. Off Beat Becker &■ Slush Pump Roen, K. r'OOS 
at Home. Clyde and his pin up<. 




Activities 







1947 Homecoming Queen 
JEAN STERN] R 



H 



1947 



omecoming 




| 
II AX STERNER 

Xttendant 

LUELLA 
DRUMMOND 



CH«»D 



Stout chose "CAVU" .is the theme lor their annual homecoming, which was the weekend of 
October 24. 25. and 26. 

On Thursday evening, October 23, the students and faculty filled the auditorium to enjoy the r 
mantic comedy, "The Wedding," presented by the Manual Arts Players. The play was presented . 
Oil Friday evening lor alumni, parents, mm) town people. Alter the final curtain everyone joined the 
band in the torchlight parade to the fair grounds. There. Walk Hammerburg, captain of the football 

team, lit the traditional bonfire, built by the freshmen. 

Saturday morning alumni and students gether at their fraternity .md society breakfasts. In 

the afternoon crowds lined their business street to watch the parade. Many floats were reprcsc: 
After the paraC was held for alumni and faculty in the Harvey Memorial. 

The challenging game with La Crosse- was played in the evening at Nelson Field. The final score 
was 7-<. in ia\or of 1. i rosse. At the half Kan Sterner was crowned homecoming queen of 1947 by 
I. is; year's queen, Miriam TeBeest. Prizes were awarded to Pallas Athene society for the most beautiful 
entry, and the Senior class tor the most humorous, the F.O.B.'s also won a prize lor the float in keeping 
with the theme. 

Alter the game everyone completed the evening by dancing at the armory or in the gym. 



. Xttendants 

k; tii ANN 

CHRISTIAN'S! >\ 

GERTRUDE 
PROVOST 

MADMAN 
ERICKSON 




nun 




Aren't we devils thought. It beats workjng. K.F.S. Target practice. The bonfire. Workers for Homecoming. Wedded 
Bliss. 



CI12] 




Homecoming flout, Briggi Stanley Steamer, Loo^ what marrying Sam caught. Dorm girls flying high, Hon- high I am, 
Loo\ at Harvey now. The boys enroute to the annex, Th: hand struts itself. 



r nil 




THE JUNIOR 
PROMENADE 

KING: WILLIAM Vol \< ! 
QUEEN: PEGGY Wl-.LCH 



THE GRAND MARCH: Leading the procession— left to tight: 
Mrs. Kenneth Schank, Jr. Clas- Vice President Kenneth Schank, 
Queen Welch and Jr. I sident William You 




CH41 



Climaxing the formal social activities of the College year, the annual Junior Promenade was 
held on Saturday evening, May 15. 

In an artistic setting of a lighthouse] a ship, swimming fishes, a\u\ other marine animal life, the 
prom centered around its theme — "How Deep Is the Ocean." Sweet music furnished by Johnny 
Farewell's Orchestra blended into an evening ot enjoyment and added another page to tin- album 
of college memo;: 

The traditional coronation of the Prom Queen a\u\ the thrill of the Grand March high lighted 
the evening. Reigning as King of the Promenade. William Young, junior class president, crowned 
Miss Peggy Welch, of Meiiomonie, as his Queen. The queenly crown was composed of a giant white 
orchid spotted with baby purple orchids. 

Attended by many socially-minded students in formal dress, the 1948 Junior Promenade proved 
to be a successtul one to many of those who attended, it will remain as a happy college memory. 




CIH] 




Loo\ out girls Don is litre. . I aggie pulling a Tom Sat 
One of the Boys. Substitution for Leather Lip. If Coach could 
see me note. Swivel Hips. Watch my smote. 



CHAD 




Graduate Program 





RAY A. WIGEN 

tudics 

Professor oj Education 




The Graduate Program 

A dynamic democrat i. tremen- 

dous premium on educational leadership at all 
instruction. The Graduate Program at 
Stout has as one of its primary objectives that ol 
preparation for professional leadership in the spe- 
cial fields of industrial education and home econ- 
omics. In attaining this goal, emphasis is placed on 
a\\ integrated five-year curriculum and a balanced 
program in terms of academic preparation. Educa- 
tional leaders must he able to intelligently attack 
a\h\ solve their problems in a scientific manner. 
Training in the techniques of educational research 

is an integral pan of the graduate program. 



STUART ANDERS >N 

';/ Professor of Education 
(dies 



[M>0 



LYMAN BERG 

Eau Claire. Wisconsin 



, I \« ) ( \KAIX)RI 
Evelcth. Minnesota 



RAYMOND CHRISTMAN 
Flint, Mid 



MARY CLARK 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



WARD COWLES 
Council Bluff. Iowa 




ROBERT DuCHARME 
sha, Wisconsin 



iRGE HENDRICKS* >N 
Duluth, Minnesota 



DON \I.D IVERSON 



MELVIN LEMON 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 



CLARENCE MERKLEY 
Neenah, Wisconsin 



CU9] 



ROBERT I WIS 
Mancelona, Michigan 



ROBERT KELLERMAN 

Cumln'Maml. Wisconsin 



WALTER LaTONDRl SSE 
Chassell, Michigan 



DONALD LIPPOLD 

' IswegO, Illinois 



LORN A LITTLE 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 




i 'Alt fe 




WILLIAM MITCHELL 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



PHILLIP RLEHL 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



JAMES STRIEBEL 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



DANIEL SW ANSON 
Orion, Illinois 



DOROTHY FREES 
THOMPSON 

(-able, Wisconsin 



C120 3 



IIAYDEN CARMICHAEL 

Paris. Kentucky 



i.vi.i CROSBY 
ville, Wisconsin 



ANNAMAE YOUNG 
EHERT 

("able. Wisi 



WILLIAM WATSON 
Bomarton, Texas 




CARLTON ERICKSON 
Green Bay, Wisconsin 



RICHARD HAMILTON 
Menomonie. Wia 



AUDREY KEITH 
HANSON 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 



KENNETH WOLD 
Mcnonomie. Wisconsin 



LAWRENCE WRIGHT 
Fall River. Wisconsin 



r l?i 1 



RAYMOND PITTMAN 

Clear Lake. Wisconsin 




EDWARD MULLER 
Mi II town. Wisconsin 



Graduate Men's Club 



The Graduate Men's Club is an organization tor men enrolled in graduate studies in the division of industrial education 
o: The Stout Institute. The club was organized in the fall of 1946 when graduate Studies were lirst offered during the i 
school year. From 19.55 until 1 ( >46 the only formal organization of graduate men had taken place during the summer sessions. 
The purpose of the club is to further the professional, educational, and social interests of the men enrolled in graduate studies. 
At intervals during the school year, discussions, talk -.ers. and movies hold the attention of the members. 

lentS desiring membership ma) raster with the secretary. Honorary membership is extended to all male faculty 
members of The Stout Institute 



Row One: Mr. Wigen, advise] on Ericksen, Raymond Pittman, Kenneth Wold. Phillip Ruehl, Donald Lippold, Mr. 

Anderson, adviser. 

Row Tito: Richard Hamilton. Donald [verson, Robert Kellerman, Lyle Crosley, Edward Saxhaug, Elmer Rudig 

Row Thru: Ward Cowles, Daniel Swanson. Clarence Mcrkley, Omer Henn. James Striebd, Leno Caradori. I.yn Kir 

Row Four: Edward Muller, Gibson Van Patter. Robert DuCharme, Raymond Christman. Dick Klatt. Melvin Lemon. 




D22D 




Smitty's on the ball. Slugfest for Billie, Some of Hanson's Boys, Is Louie .hound. Jobs contracted after 8 P.M., S.M..L 
Memories. 



Z12S1 




Hunting Bare by Slip Sttcf{, Diaper Drawers Timmerman, The amateurs. What a dream I had. Hog & his George 
Washington Legion, Target for Tonight. . I st n$e of Humor, W.P.. I. at uork^. The Band "Honor Hound." 



C124D